Legal Question in Family Law in Georgia

My child support agreement reads that i must pay till 18 unless they marry or die etc. Where my question comes in is when it says "support continues until the child completes secondary school, provided that such support shall not be required after the child attains 20 years of age." So does this mean even if they are in school, support ends at 20?

Asked on 4/11/13, 6:07 am

2 Answers from Attorneys

Glen Ashman Ashman Law Office
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It means exactly what it says. If your children have not completed high school by age 18, support continues until they do, but not past age 20. That is the normal language used in Georgia.

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4/11/13, 6:10 am
Tahira Piraino Tahira P. Piraino
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Some people confuse "secondary school" with college. Secondary school means high school. The clause means if your child turns 18 while still in high school, you continue to pay support until graduation. If the child turns 18 and has graduated high school, child support ends at 18. The extension to 20 years is only if, for whatever reason, your child has not graduated prior to 20. Usually the child must be enrolled full time. However, your child support order may or may not include that language.

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4/12/13, 7:25 am

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