Definition of IMMORALITY


IMMORALITY

that which is contra bonos mores. In England, it is
not punishable in some cases, at the common law, on, account of the
ecclesiastical jurisdictions: e. g. adultery. But except in cases
belonging to the ecclesiastical courts, the court of king s bench
is the custom morum, and may punish delicto contra bonos mores. 3
Burr. Rep. 1438; 1 Bl. Rep. 94; 2 Strange, 788. In Pennsylvania,
and most, if not all the United States, all such cases come under
one and the same jurisdiction.

2. Immoral contracts are generally void; an agreement in
consideration of future illicit cohabitation between the parties;
3 Burr. 1568; S. C. 1 Bl. Rep. 517; 1 Esp. R. 13; 1 B. & P. 340,
341; an agreement for the value of libelous and immoral pictures,
4 Esp. R. 97; or for printing a libel, 2 Stark. R. 107; or for an
immoral wager, Chit. Contr. 156, cannot, therefore, be enforced.
For whatever arises from an immoral or illegal consideration, is
void: quid turpi ex causa promissum est non valet. Inst. 3, 20,
24.

3. It is a general rule, that whenever an agreement appears to be
illegal, immoral, or against public policy, a court of justice
leaves the parties where it finds them; when the agreement has
been executed, the court will not rescind it; when executory, the
count will not help the execution. 4 Ohio R. 419; 4 John. R. 419;
11 John. R. 388; 12 John. R. 306; 19 John. R. 341; 3 Cowen s R.
213; 2 Wils. R. 341.

Source: Bouviers Law Dictionary 1856 Edition

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z