Definition of INJUNCTION


INJUNCTION

rpetual injunction will be decreed.
Ed. Inj. 253.

12. The interdict (q. v.) of the Roman law resembles, in many
respects, our injunction. It was used in three distinct, but
cognate senses. 1. It was applied to signify the edicts made by the
proctor, declaratory of his intention to give a remedy in certain
cases, chiefly to preserve or to restore possession; this interdict
was called edictal; edictale, quod praetoriis edictis proponitur,
ut sciant omnes ea forma posse implorari. 2. It was used to signify
his order or decree, applying the remedy in the given case before
him, and then was called decretal; decretale, quod praetor re nata
implorantibus decrevit. It is this which bears a strong resemblance
to the injunction of a court of equity. 3. It was used, in the last
place, to signify the very remedy sought in the suit commenced
under the proctor s edict; and thus it became the denomination of
the action itself. Livingston on the Batture case, 5, Am. Law Jour.
271; 2 Story, Eq. Jur. 865; Analyse des Pandectes de
Pothier, h.t.; Dict. du Dig. h.t.; Clef des Lois Rom. h. t.;
Heineccii, Elem. Pand.Ps. 6, 285, 28
Vide, generally, Eden on Injunctions; 1 Madd. Ch. Pr. 125 to 165;
Blake s Ch. Pr. 330 to 344; 1 Chit. Pr. 701 to 731; Coop. Eq. Pl.
Index, h. t.; Redesd. Pl. Index, h. t.; Smith s Ch. Pr. h. t.; 14
Vin. Ab. 442; 2 Hov. Supp. to Ves. jr. 173, 434, 442; Com. Dig.
Chancery, D 8; Newl. Pr. o. 4, s. 7; Bouv. Inst. Index, h. t.

Source: Bouviers Law Dictionary 1856 Edition

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