Definition of CANCELLATION


CANCELLATION

Its general acceptation, is the act of crossing a writing;
it is used sometimes to signify the manual operation of tearing or destroying
the instrument itself. Hyde v. Hyde, 1 Eq. Cas. Abr. 409; Rob. on Wills,
367, n.

2. Cancelling a will, animo revocandi, is a revocation of it, and it is
unnecessary to show a complete destruction or obliteration. 2 B. & B. 650;
3 B. & A. 489; 2 Bl. R. 1043; 2 Nott & M"Cord, 272; Whart. Dig. Wills, c.;
4 Mass. 462. When a duplicate has been cancelled, animo revocandi, it is
the cancellation of both parts. 2 Lee, Ecc. R. 532.

3. But the mere act of cancelling a will is nothing, unless it be done animo
revocandi, and evidence is admissible to show, quo animo, the testator cancelled
it., 7 Johns. 394 2 Dall. 266; S. C. 2 Yeates, 170; 4 Serg. & Rawle, 297;
cited 2 Dall. 267, n.; 3 Hen. & Munf. 502; Rob. on Wills, 365; Lovel, 178;
Toll. on Ex"rs, Index, h. t.; 3 Stark. Ev. 1714; 1 Adams" Rep. 529 Mass.
307; 5 Conn. 262; 4 Wend. 474; 4 Wend. 585; 1 Harr. &
M"H. 162; 4 Conn. 550; 8 Verm. 373; 1 N. H. Rep. 1; 4 N. H. Rep. 191; 2
Eccl. Rep. 23.

4. As to the effect of cancelling a deed, which has not been recorded, see
1 Adams" Rep. 1; Palm. 403; Latch. 226; Gilb. Law, Ev. 109, 110; 2 H . Bl.
263: 2 Johns. 87 1 Greenl. R. 78; 10 Mass. 403; 9 Pick. 105; 4 N. H. Rep.
191; Greenl. Ev. 265; 5 Conn. 262; 4 Conn. 450; 5 Conn. 86; 2 John. R. 84;
4 Yerg. 375; 6 Mass. 24; 11 Mass. 337; 2 Curt. Ecc. R. 458.

5. As to when a court of equity will order an agreement or other instrument
to be cancelled and delivered up, see 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 3917-22.

Source: Bouviers Law Dictionary 1856 Edition

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