Legal Definitions Search Results for "I" -


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Search Results for "I"

INN
A house where a traveller is furnished with every thing he has occasion for while on his way. Bac. Ab. Inns. B; 12 Mod. 255; 3... more

INNAVIGABLE
Not capable of being navigated.... more

INNINGS
estates. Lands gained from the sea by draining. Cunn. L. Dict. h. t.; Law of Sewers, 31.... more

INNKEEPER
He is defined to be the keeper of a common inn for the lodging and entertainment of travellers and passengers, their horses and attendants, for a... more

INNOCENCE
The absence of guilt.2. The law presumes in favor of innocence, even against another presumption of law: for example, when a woman marries a second hushand within... more

INNOCENT CONVEYANCES
This term is used in England, technically, to signify those conveyances made by a tenant of his leasehold, which do not occasion a forfeiture these are... more

INNOMINATE CONTRACTS
civil law. Contracts which have no particular names, as permutation and transaction, are so called. Inst. 2, 10, 13. There are many innominate contracts, but the Roman lawyers... more

INNOTESCIMUS
English law. An epithet used for letters-patent, which are always of a charter of feoffment, or some other instrument not of record, concluding with the words Innotescimus per... more

INNOVATION
r ought to be immutable; changes are required by the alteration of circumstances; amendments, by the imperfections of all human institutions but laws ought never to be changed... more

INNOVATION
Scotch law. The exchange of one obligation for another, so that the second shall come in the place of the first. Bell s Scotch Law Dict. h.... more

INNS OF COURT
Engl. law. The name given to the colleges of the English professors and students of the common law. 2. The four principal Inns of Court are the... more

INNUENDO
pleading. An averment which explains the defendoant s meaning by reference to antecedent matter. Salk. 513; 1 Ld. Raym. 256; 12 Mod. 139; 1 Saund. 243. The... more

INOFFICIOUS
civil law. This word is frequently used with others; as, inofficious testament, inofficiosum testamentum; inofficious gift, donatio inofficiosa. An inofficious testament is one not made according to the... more

INOPS CONSILII
Destitute or without counsel. In the construction of wills a greater latitude is given, because the testator is supposed to have been inops consilii.... more

INQUEST
A body of men appointed by law to inquire into certain matters; as, the inquest examined into the facts connected with the alleged murder; the grand... more

INQUIRY, WRIT OF
A writ of inquiry is one issued where a judgment has been entered in a case sounding in damages, without any particular amount being ascertained; this... more

INQUISITION
practice. An examination of certain facts by a jury impannelled by the sheriff for the purpose; the instrument of writing on which their decision is made is... more

INQUISITOR
A designation of sheriffs, coroners, super visum corporis, and the like, who have power to inquire into certain matters.2. The name, of an officer, among ecclesiastics,... more

INROLLMENT
The act of putting upon a roll. Formerly, the record of a suit was kept on skins of parchment, which, best to preserve them, were kept... more

INSANE
One deprived of the use of reason, after he has arrived at the age when he ought to have it, either by a natural defect... more

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