Legal Definitions Search Results for "I" -


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Search Results for "I"

INSTANTER
Immediately; presently. This term, it is said, means that the act to which it applies, shall be done within twenty-four hours but a doubt has been... more

INSTAR
Likeness; resemblance; equivalent as, instar dentium, like teeth; instar omnium, equivalent to all.... more

INSTIGATION
The act by which one incites another to do something, as to injure a third person, or to commit some crime or misdemeanor, to coramence a... more

INSTITOR
civ. law. A clerk in a store an agent.2. He was so called because he watched over the business with which he was charged; and it... more

INSTITUTE
Scotch law. The person first called in the tailzie; the rest, or the heirs of tailzie, are called substitutes. Ersk. Pr. L. Scot. 3, 8, 8. See... more

TO INSTITUTE
To name or to make an heir by testament. Dig. 28, 5, 65. To make an accusation; to commence an action.... more

INSTITUTES
The principles or first elements of jurisprudence.2. Many books have borne the title of Institutes. Among the most celebrated in the common law, are the... more

INSTITUTION
eccl. law. The act by which the ordinary commits the cure of souls to a person presented to a benefice.... more

INSTITUTION
political law. That which has been established and settled by law for the public good; as, the American institutions guaranty to the citizens all privileges and immunities... more

INSTITUTION
practice. The commencement of an action; as, A B has instituted a suit against C D, to recover damages for a trespass.... more

INSTITUTION OF HEIR
civil law. The act by which a testator nominates one or more persons to succeed him in all his rights, active and passive. Poth. Tr. des Donations... more

INSTRUCTION
French law. This word signifies the meaus used and formality employed to prepare a case for trial. it is generally applied to criminal cases, and is then... more

INSTRUCTIONS
they are accidentally injured and must be sold to prevent further loss; or if they are in imminent danger of being lost by the capture of the port... more

INSTRUCTIONS
practice. The statements of a cause of action, given by a client to his attorney, and which, where such is the practice, are sent to his pleader... more

INSTRUMENT
contracts. The writing which contains some agreement, and is so called because it has been prepared as a memorial of what has taken place or been agreed... more

INSTRUMENTA
This word is properly applied to designate that kind of evidence, which consists of writings not under seal, as court rolls, accounts, and the like. 3... more

INSULA
Latin. An island. In the Roman law the word is applied to a house not connected with other houses, but separated by a surrounding space of ground.... more

INSUFFICIENCY
What is not competent; not enough.... more

INSUPER
Eng. law. The balance due by an accountant in the exchequer, as apparent by his account. The auditors in settling his account say there remains so much... more

INSURABLE INTEREST
That right of property which may be the subject of an insurance.2. The policy of commerce, and the various complicated rights which different persons may have... more

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