Legal Question in Immigration Law in Washington

Work with Social Security number

Is there a way to obtain a social security number to work in the united states if you are married to a US citizen that needs you to care for them?


Asked on 3/21/08, 10:45 am

3 Answers from Attorneys

Sameer Kumar Law Offices of Sameer Kumar, P.C.

Re: Work with Social Security number

If you are married to a US citizen and entered the country legally you can acquire a SS# under normal circumstances. But there is a filing process that is required. There are also more details that I would need in order to be sure that you were eligible. Feel free to call me for a few minutes and we'll go through the facts.

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Answered on 3/21/08, 11:10 am


Baoqin Wang Law Office of Baoqin Wang

Re: Work with Social Security number

You need to start the permanent resident application process and apply for work permit. With the work permit or permanent resident card, you can apply for social security number.

Please contact us directly if you need help with the immigration process.

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Answered on 3/21/08, 4:53 pm
Glen Prior Pacific Law, Inc., P.S.

Re: Work with Social Security number

If you last entered the United States with a visa and you are now married to a U.S. citizen, then you could adjust your status to that of U.S. permanent resident (providing you are not deemed inadmissible for certain crimes, health, terrorist activites, nazi, etc.) (Forms I-130, I-485, I-765 (work auth.) etc. ), and obtain a work authorization card while you are waiting for you interview in the U.S., and with such work authorization (EAD employment authorization document) you can go to the social security agency and obtain a social security number). If you did not enter the U.S. with permission, and you did not enter the U.S. through a regular port of entry, you may still be able to adjust your status if your aunt or uncle filed a relative petition for your parent, or your parents filed a relative petition for you while you were under the age of 21 and unmarried, or an employer filed a labor certification application for you, or your brother or sister filed a relative petition for you and the application was filed on or before April 30, 2001 (If the filing was after January 14, 1998, you also have to establish that you were physically present in the U.S. on December 21, 2000) . You also have to establish that you are not inadmissible to enter the U.S. because of crimes, health, terrorist , nazi, etc. There may be available consular processing but definitely speak with an immigration attorney about this option, especially because of the 10 year bar under INA 212(a)(9)(B) (waiver available , Form I-601) , or if you left the U.S. after 1997, and stayed over a year in the U.S. over time, and reentered the U.S. after the one year accrued after coming back and forth to the U.S., then under INA 212(a)(9)(C), there is a 10 year bar and no waiver available . It would be beneficial to speak with an immigration attorney about your situation before doing ANY filing of forms etc. with the Immigration Service. Also in your case, if you have 10 years in the U.S. (excess of 90 days on one visit, 6 months on all visits in last ten years stops the ten years from running further) , good moral character, have not committed certain deportable crimes , and you can show that if you had to leave your spouse, that she would suffer extreme and unusual hardship, then you may also have a case in the U.S. before an immigration judge . See http://immigrationflowchart.com (a free service) at end83,214,177,214,442 for further information you can pass on to your attorney.

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Answered on 4/05/08, 9:31 pm

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