Legal Question in Business Law in California

In the state of California, am I as an employer required to give a 24 hour notice before deciding that an employee does not need to work their shift on a given day? Or can I simply let them know they are not needed for the day?

Asked on 7/09/13, 6:12 pm

4 Answers from Attorneys

Timothy McCormick Libris Solutions - Dispute Resolution Services
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If they show up and you send them home they are entitled to 1/2 their regular pay for the day, not to exceed four hours pay. If you notify them before they leave home, you owe them nothing.

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7/09/13, 6:27 pm
Bryan Whipple Bryan R. R. Whipple, Attorney at Law
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Unless you have a union contract (or, for that matter, and contract with the employee) mandating a different result, there is no legal requirement for 24 hour notice; any prior notice is sufficient.

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7/09/13, 6:32 pm
Bryan Whipple Bryan R. R. Whipple, Attorney at Law
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Typo -- I meant "any contract," not "and contract." Sorry.

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7/09/13, 6:52 pm
Anthony Roach Law Office of Anthony A. Roach
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I agree with Mr. McCormick, and suggest you take a careful look at section 5 of the Industrial Wage Order that would apply to your employee.

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7/10/13, 2:29 pm

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