California  |  Employment Law

Legal Question

Asked on: 7/22/13, 4:55 pm

My wife works for CVS pharmacy full time. The district manager has told store management to dock the full time workers 30 min. of work time per day, in an entire district of several stores, to ensure no overtime is accumulated. They are not docking her pay mind you, just not allowing her to work the full 40 a week, by only scheduling 7.5 hr days. Sounds kind of fishy to me. By taking away the 30 minutes daily, it lowers my wife's monthly income by over 160.00. This just seems like it is not within the labor laws. It has a catch 22. If anyone gripes about it, I'm sure they would be made an example of. Sad but true.

2 Answers


Answered on: 7/22/13, 6:21 pm by Timothy McCormick

Do you really think that there are labor laws that say an employer is forced to give hourly employees 40 hours of work per week? Sorry, no. As long as they comply with overtime and rest break laws, and pay the agreed wage for hours worked, they have complied with the law.


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Answered on: 7/23/13, 12:53 am by Terry A. Nelson

There is nothing 'illegal' about this. Employers are entitled to set and change hours, duties, titles, compensation, benefits, leaves, vacations, holidays, policies, rules, etc., just not retroactively. Making matters worse for you, when ObamaCare kicks in, many employers are going to be dropping insurance coverage, reducing people to under 30 hours, and other techniques to stay in business by reducing costs.


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Nelson & Lawless 18685 Main St., #175 Huntington Beach, CA 92648

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